RICHLAND HILLS ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT

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                              2013 CITY OF RICHLAND HILLS ANNUAL                                 DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT 
 

 

In 2013, your tap water met all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state drinking water health standards.  The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has established public water system ratings, and Richland Hills’ water supply system received the highest achievable rating-Superior.

Where do we get our drinking water?

Our drinking water is obtained from GROUND and SURFACE water sources.  The surface water is purchased from The City of Fort Worth.  Fort Worth uses water from Lake Worth, Eagle Mountain Lake, Lake Bridgeport, Richland Chambers Reservoir, Cedar Creek Reservoir, Lake Benbrook and the Clear Fork Trinity River.  Fort Worth owns Lake Worth.  The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers is responsible for Benbrook Lake.  The other four lakes are owned and operated by Tarrant Regional Water District.  The groundwater supply is from the Trinity and Paluxy aquifers and operated by Richland Hills.  The average daily water consumption for Richland Hills is approximately 1 million gallons.

Information for Immuno-compromised People

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer under-going chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk for infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by microbial contaminants are available from the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline, 800-426-4791.

How can I get involved?

By attending a Richland Hills City Council meeting on the 1st or 3rd Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the council chambers at 3200 Diana Drive.  If you have a question about Richland Hills’ drinking water quality, or would like to schedule a meeting for your group or organization please call (817)616-3830.

En Español

Éste reporte incluye importante información sobre el agüa potable. Si tiene preguntas ó comentarios sóbre éste reporte, puede comunicarse con una representate bilinqüe al teléfono (817) 616-3830.

 

About the following information

The following information lists all the federally regulated or monitored contaminants which have been found in Richland Hills’ drinking water in 2013.  The U.S. EPA requires water systems to test for up to 100 contaminants and must meet 91 regulations for water safety and quality.  The data included is from calendar 2013 unless otherwise indicated.  In addition, since Richland Hills purchases much of its water from the City of Fort Worth, the levels are a compilation of both entities annual sampling results with the highest detected levels shown.

 

TCEQ accesses raw water supplies

TCEQ completed an assessment of our source water and the results indicate some of our sources are susceptible to certain contaminants.  The sampling requirements for our water system are based on this susceptibility and previous sample data.  Any detection of these contaminants will be found in this water quality report.  For more information please contact us at 817-616-3830.  Some of this source water information is available on Texas Drinking Water Watch at www.tceq.texas.gov/gis/swaview

 

Microorganism testing shows low detections in Fort Worth water sources

Tarrant Regional Water District monitors the raw water at all Fort Worth water intake sites for Cryptosporidium, Giardia Lambia and viruses.  The source is human and animal fecal waste in the watershed.  No viruses were detected, but Cryptosporidium and Giardia Lambia, microbial parasites common in surface water, were detected at very low levels.  The Cryptosporidium testing methods cannot determine if the parasite is dead or inactive or alive and capable of causing cryptosporidiosis.   This is an abdominal infection that causes nausea, diarrhea and abdominal cramps after ingestion.  The drinking water treatment process is designed to remove Cryptosporidium and Giardia Lambia through filtration.

Why are there contaminants in my drinking water?

The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses, bacteria and protozoans that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems.

 

Radioactive contaminants that can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by the public water systems.  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide protection for public health.

Abbreviations used in tables:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCLI) – the highest permissible level of a contaminant in drinking water, MCLS are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible using the best available treatment.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) – the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk.  MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) – the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRLD) – the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Treatment Technique (TT) – a required process intended to reduce the level of contaminants in drinking water.

Action Level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

N/A – not applicable

AVG – Regulatory compliance with some MCL’s are based on running annual average of monthly samples.

NTU – Nephelometric Turbidity Units

MFL – million fibers per liter (a measure of asbestos)

ppb – parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (µg/L)

pCi/L – picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)

ppt – parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter

ppm – parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/L)

ppq – parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter

 

Lead and Copper

Year

Contaminant

The 90th Percentile

Number of Sites Exceeding Action Level

Action Level

Unit of Measure

Source of Contaminant

2013

Lead

0.00151

0

0.015

mg/L

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits

2013

Copper

0.217

0

1.3

mg/L

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits, leaching from wood preservatives.

If present, elevated levels of lead can lead to serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and private plumbing.  This water supply is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.   If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Contaminant

Measure

MCL

2013 Highest single result

Lowest monthly % of samples ≤0.3 NTU

MCLG

Common Sources of Substance

Turbidity

NTU

TT

0.38

99.4%

N/A

Soil runoff

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water.  It is monitored because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of the filtration system in Fort Worth’s water.

Contaminant

Measure

MCL

2013 Level

Range

MCLG

Common Sources of Substance

Total Coliforms (including fecal coliform & E. coli

% of positive samples

Presence in 5% or less of monthly samples

0 to 2.2% of Fort Worth

monthly samples

0.0 to 2.2%

0

Coliforms are naturally present in the environment as well as feces; fecal coliforms and E. coli only come from human and animal fecal waste

Richland Hills’ monthly tests found no E. coli and no fecal coliform bacteria

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level

Year

Contaminant

Average Level

Minimum Level

Maximum Level

MRDL

MRDLG

Unit of Measure

Source of Contaminant

2013

Chloramines

2.24

0.60

4.0

4.0

4.0

ppm

Water additive used to control microbes

Contaminant

High

Low

Average

MCL

MCLG

Common Sources of Substance

Total Organic Carbon₁

1

1

1

TT = % removal

N/A

Naturally occurring

₁Testing for Total Organic Carbon is used to determine disinfection by-product precursors.  Fort Worth was in compliance with all monitoring and treatment technique requirements for disinfection by-product precursors.

Contaminant

Measure

MCL

2013 Level

Range

MCLG

Common Sources of Substance

Alpha particles₂

pCi/L

15

2.8

0 to 2.8

N/a

Erosion of natural deposit

Gross Beta emitters₂

pCi/L

50

7.5

0 to 7.5

N/A

Decay of natural and man-made deposits of certain minerals that are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photon and beta radiation

Radium 228₂

pCi/L

5

1.1

0 to 1.1

0

Erosion of natural deposits

Arsenic

ppb

10

4.48

1.33 to 4.48

0

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

Atrazine

ppb

3

0.087

0.04 to 0.22

3

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops

Barium

ppm

2

0.06

0.05 to 0.06

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Chromium(Total)

ppb

100

2.12

1.28 to 2.12

100

Discharge from steel and pulp mills, erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

ppm

4

0.65

0.23 to 0.65

4

Water additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen)

ppm

10

0.060

0.045 to 0.060

10

Runoff from fertilizer use/ leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Nitrite (measured as Nitrogen)

ppm

1

<0.004

<0.004

1

Runoff from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines

Selenium

ppb

50

3.98

2.92 to 3.98

50

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines

Bromate

ppb

10

0.08

0 to 0.08

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Haloacetic Acids

ppb

60

8.90

2.20 to 8.90

N/A

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Total Trihalomethanes

ppm

80

26.1

5.60 to 26.1

N/A

By-product of drinking water disinfection

₂Because of historically low levels of radionuclides in its water, TCEQ has Fort Worth on a reduced monitoring schedule.  The test results shown are from 2011 to 2013.

 In the water loss audit submitted to the Texas Water Development Board for the time period of October 2012 to September 2013, our system lost an estimated 21,180,816.35 gallons of water, or 7.11% of the water produced. If you have any questions about the water loss audit please call 817-616-3830.

 

Unregulated Disinfection By-products

Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards.  The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted.

Contaminant

Measure

Range of Detects

2013 Level

MCL

MCLG

Common Sources of Substance

Chloral Hydrate

ppb

0.3 to 0.68

0.68

Not regulated

None

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Bromoform

ppb

0 to 9.2

9.2

Not regulated

None

By-products of drinking water disinfection; not regulated individually; included in Total Trihalomethanes

Bromodichloromethane

ppb

1.8 to 8.19

8.19

Not regulated

None

Chloroform

ppb

0 to 14.4

14.4

Not regulated

None

Dibromochloromethane

ppb

1.6 to 3.82

3.82

Not regulated

None

Monochloroacetic Acid

ppb

0 to 2.20

2.20

Not regulated

70

By-products of drinking water disinfection; not regulated individually; included in Haloacetic Acids

Dichloroacetic Acid

ppb

1.0 to 5.40

5.40

Not regulated

None

Trichloroacetic Acid

ppb

0 to 2.0

2.0

Not regulated

20

Monobromoacetic Acid

ppb

0 to 1.3

1.3

Not regulated

None

Dibromoacetic Acid

ppb

0 to 2.1

2.1

Not regulated

None

Bromochloracetic Acid

ppb

1.3 to 2.6

2.6

Not regulated

None

 

Secondary Constituents

These items do not relate to public health but rather to the

 aesthetic effects.  These items are often important to industry.

Item

Measure

2013 Range

Bicarbonate

ppm

88 to 114

Calcium

ppm

31 to 42

Chloride

ppm

10 to 26

Conductivity

µmhos/cm

264 to 360

pH

units

7.7 to 8.3

Magnesium

ppm

3 to 6

Sodium

ppm

17 to 27

Sulfate

ppm

22 to 36

Total Alkalinity as CaCOз

ppm

88 to 114

Total Dissolved Solids

ppm

150 to 244

Total Hardness as CaCOз

ppm

92 to 122

Total Hardness in Grains

grains/gallon

5 to 7

 

Data gathering to determine if more regulation needed


Water utilities in the United States monitor for more than 100 contaminants and must meet 91 regulations for water safety and quality.

But should other contaminants be regulated?  The 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act amendments require that once every five years EPA issue a new list of not more than 30 unregulated contaminants to be monitored by public water systems.  This monitoring provides a basis for future regulatory actions to protect public health.

The first Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 1) was published on Sept. 17, 1999, the second (UCMR 2) was published on Jan. 4, 2007 and the third (UCMR3) was published on May 2, 2012.  Fort Worth did not detect any of the contaminants in the UCMR 1 and UCMR 2 testing.

The third Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule includes assessment for 21 chemical contaminants, 7 hormones and two viruses.  The virus testing did not impact Fort Worth water purchased by Richland Hills.  This testing was limited to small groundwater systems that do not disinfect.

UCMR benefits the environment and public health by providing EPA and other interested parties with scientifically valid data on the occurrence of these contaminants in drinking water.  Health information is necessary to know whether these contaminants pose a health risk.

Public water systems will sample for these contaminants for four consecutive quarters from 2013 to 2015.  Fort Worth’s sampling occurred from June 2013 through March 2014.  The results shown are for the first three quarters of sampling in Fort Worth.  The final quarter’s results will appear in next year’s annual water quality report.  Richland Hills will begin UCMR 3 testing in March 2015.

 

 

UCMR 3

Fort Worth’s testing detected only 6 of the 21 chemical contaminants and none of the seven hormones.

Contaminant

Measure

Range of Detects

2013 Level

MRL

Common Sources of Substance

Bromochloromethane

(Halon 1011)

ppb

0 to 0.25

0.25

0.06

Used as a fire extinguishing fluid; a explosive suppressant; a solvent in the manufacturing of pesticides

Vanadium

ppb

0.56 to 1.6

1.6

0.2

Naturally occurring elemental metal; used as vanadium pentoxide which is a chemical intermediate and a catalyst

Molybdenum

ppb

1.6 to 2.5

2.5

1

Naturally occurring element found in ores and present in plants, animals and bacteria; commonly used form molybdenum trioxide is used as a chemical reagent

Strontium

ppb

260 to 330

330

0.3

Naturally occurring element; historically, commercial use of strontium has been in the faceplate class of cathode-ray tube televisions to block x-ray emissions

Chromium¹

ppb

0 to 0.4

0.4

0.2

Naturally occurring element; used in making steel and other alloys; chromium-3 or -6 forms are used for chrome plating; dyes and pigments, leather tanning and wood preservation

Chromium-6

ppb

0 to 0.14

0.14

0.03

Chlorate

ppb

0 to 720

720

20

Agricultural defoliant or desiccant; disinfection byproduct; and used in production of chlorine dioxide

¹Total Chromium, the sum of Chromium in all its valence states, is already regulated in drinking water. As part of UCMR 3, EPA requires testing for Total Chromium in the same samples used to test for Chromium 6, which is on the UCMR 3 list. The value differs from what is listed in the previous table (Chromium Total) because of different sampling periods. The MCL for EPA’s current total chromium regulation was determined based upon the health effects of Chromium 6.

 

UCMR 3 contaminants not detected

Chemicals

1,2,3-trichloropropane                                                      perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS)

1,3-butadiene                                                                       perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA)

chloromethane (methyl chloride)                                   perflourobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS)

1,1-dichloroethane                                                             Hormones

bromomethane                                                                   17-ß-estradiol

chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)                                 17-α-ethynylestradiol

1,4-dioxane                                                                         estriol

Cobalt                                                                                   equilin

perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS)                           estrone   

perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)                                      testosterone

perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)                                     4-androstene-3,17-dione

 

 

 

 

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